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Night of Judaism – March 24

Categories: Announcements,Events,HHP

The »Night of Judaism« is the annual public event of the Jonge Judaici. The Jonge Judaici is an organisation by and for Young Scholars in the field of Jewish Studies that aims to serve as a platform for academic exchange and networking. This time, the programme is all about the crossover of Judaism x Magic and is entirely held in English.

This year it will be an online event, and will take place on 24 March, 7 pm to 9 pm.
To register please send an e-mail to Jonge Judaici. You will then receive a conformation of registration and the Zoom link as soon as possible.

Adam Bursi (postdoc) introduces us in his paper ‘Whispered Words and Sourcerous Spittle: Healing Magic and Communal Boundaries in Late Antique Iraq’ to the power inherent in words and rituals of ancient healing practices. Dennis van Dijk (RMA student) introduces us in his paper » King Solomon’s Demons and Jinn: The Origins of Solomonic Magic« to the origins of Solomonic magic, an inter-Abrahamic tradition that originated in ancient Judaism.

Full abstracts:
Adam Bursi (postdoc in the SENSIS project, Utrecht University) will deliver his lecture Adam Bursititled ‘Whispered Words and Sourcerous Spittle: Healing Magic and Communal Boundaries in Late Antique Iraq’. The power inherent in words and rituals was particularly pronounced in the realm of ancient healing practices. In his paper, Adam discusses how this power both crossed and defined communal boundaries in late antique Iraq, by examining rabbinic Jewish and early Islamic sources.

Dennis van Dijk (RMA student Religious Studies (Western Esotericism)) introduces us to the origins of Solomonic magic. Solomonic magic is an inter-Abrahamic tradition that originated in ancient Judaism. It integrates the Biblical narrative of Solomon’s construction of the First Temple with ritual, more specifically angelic and demonic magic. This paper carries out a comparative analysis of Solomonic magic in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, covering a timespan from the Second Temple period to the Arab conquests.

We hope to have the pleasure of welcoming you! Also, feel free to invite friends who might be interested.